2018 Best Apps and Websites for Teaching and Learning | American Libraries Magazine

Last updated: 07-01-2018

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2018 Best Apps and Websites for Teaching and Learning | American Libraries Magazine

2018 Best Apps and Websites for Teaching and Learning
List recognizes tools of exceptional value to inquiry-based teaching
June 28, 2018
The American Association of School Librarians (AASL) announced its 2018 Best Apps and Best Websites for Teaching and Learning at the American Library Association (ALA) Annual Conference in New Orleans. The annual lists honor 25 apps and 25 websites that provide enhanced learning and curriculum development for school librarians and their teacher collaborators. These technology resources are chosen for their ability to foster the qualities of innovation, creativity, active participation, and collaboration.
The apps recognized in 2018 are:
Clips
The websites honored in 2018 are:
AllSides for Schools
Tinkercad
Typito
Links, descriptions, and websites for both technology lists, as well as previously recognized apps and websites, can be found at  ala.org/aasl/best .
School library professionals can nominate their favorite apps and most used websites at  ala.org/aasl/best . Nominations for 2019 should be submitted by March 1, 2019; the list of 2019 best apps and websites will be recognized at the 2019 ALA Annual Conference in Washington, D.C.
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